Building the **ULTIMATE** Reloading & Gun Workbench

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Jer
Posts: 70
Joined: Sat Mar 30, 2013 10:28 am
Location: Buckhannon, WV

Building the **ULTIMATE** Reloading & Gun Workbench

Post by Jer » Sun Apr 21, 2013 1:12 pm

First I have to apologize as I've lost many many of my "project" photos. They were on an iPhone that decided to not give them to me... stupid phone. But I managed to get a couple, take a few more and piece this project thread together.

Anyone that is going to reload ammunition OR work on their guns (cleaning, repairing, building...) needs a bench. You just do. Sure, you could work on your guns on your dining room table - which may discourage your daughter from bringing her dates home; but the wife tends get upset. And with reloading, as anyone who does reload can attest, you need a STURDY bench due to the movement and the force required when cranking on the lever of the reloading press. A flimsy table will cause issues such as powder spills and general messes that can prove to be rather dangerous.

So a bench I needed as I was getting into reloading.

I searched for online plans and found several "economy" models - but none of them seemed to do the trick. They were all lacking in one way or another. The, as if in a poof of magic, I found the National Reloading Manufacturers Association's plans in a .pdf which I have linked to through the photo - just click on the picture to be taken to the online .pdf

Image

Now, for me - that design is perfect. The problem with the plans, for me, was the overall price. It was calling for solid oak - and this bench, as you will see, can be easily made with press-board for a much lower cost.

As I said before, I lost a lot of my project photos. However, here is a photo of the bench in construction:
Image
It is a shame that I lost so many photos as I had, more or less, a step by step process in photos - but now, I have a general overview and a simple recommendation that this is the bench which you should build given the tools, capability and space.

Image
As you can see between the first and second photos, I had to chop the legs a bit as the seating height wasn't comfortable, and it has been stained. Also, I put several coats of clear polyurethane on the work-space area of the bench. It's crucial for that to be smooth and free of splinters. Wiping a powder spill off of press-board would be difficult at best. So, you will certainly want to build up the layers of polyurethane to the point that the bench feels smooth to the touch.

It took me a bit to get everything set up the way I wanted it and you may or may not choose to set it up the same way - but this is what works for me and how I like it:

Image
The above is the "general overview" pic, and the current configuration of the bench and work area. The Left side is dedicated to gun cleaning, repairs and building, and the right is my reloading area.

Image
The first lower shelf and the ground "shelf" are both plenty deep for two large Cabella's Style dry-box ammo cans per spot, or for whatever storage you wish to put down there.

Image
The right side of the bench, I have set up with the press and for my general reloading area. The press is bolted directly to the bench and doesn't wiggle or shake at all. It's imperative that you use solid wood for the base as you NEED weight on the bench to keep things from rocking and rolling when you use the press. Everything is bolted down. I even mounted my Dillon quick changers to the bench. I use those so I can switch between .40 cal and 9mm in under a minute and continue to reload without wasting time re-setting my dies.

Image
The left side of the bench has been dedicated to gun cleaning, repair and building. And you can see my current AR-15 build in progress. One thing that is not shown is my vice. It is currently mounted elsewhere, but I will be relocating it to this bench for the sake of convenience. Unless you have arms like Popeye, you'll need a vice to build an AR. And they are just damn handy to have for many other things when dealing with guns.

Image
The internal shelves can be positioned for different heights. For me, I've chosen to use one of the right-side spaces for my primers (above) and my reloading manuals (below).

Image
And of course, everyone needs a place for their tools. Now this isn't all my tools - but mostly just my gun specific ones. Roll punches, pin guides, and all the other goodies.

This bench has MANY other storage compartments which I use for powder, spent primers, cleaning kits, lubrication and everything. It is, for me, the ultimate Reloading and gun work-bench that is out there. If you can put it together - do it. This design is highly recommended.

Enjoy and have fun.
Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable.
--John F. Kennedy

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Blackthorn-USA
Posts: 167
Joined: Sat Mar 09, 2013 3:23 pm
Location: Northeast Kansas
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Re: Building the **ULTIMATE** Reloading & Gun Workbench

Post by Blackthorn-USA » Sun Apr 21, 2013 7:38 pm

Damn thats sweet. I just built a bench a couple weeks ago for my new Dillon. Not as fancy as that one but I'm a novice reloader and didn't know just what I needed or would like yet. I do like the look of yours and may well use those plans in the future. Currently deciding if I want to invest in a stand alone deprimer, case trimmers and such to work with military brass. I may need a bigger bench soon.

Good post, thanks!
Image ..... Image

Pete
Posts: 3
Joined: Wed Jun 19, 2013 9:00 pm

Re: Building the **ULTIMATE** Reloading & Gun Workbench

Post by Pete » Wed Jun 19, 2013 9:13 pm

I just finished my bench and I went with a almost standing height. A bar stool works better than my old office chair and short bench for me. Also used 8ft counter top on top and ran led light strip under top shelf.

KerryRogers
Posts: 1
Joined: Sat Sep 28, 2013 6:56 am

Re: Building the **ULTIMATE** Reloading & Gun Workbench

Post by KerryRogers » Tue Oct 01, 2013 2:39 am

Jer wrote:First I have to apologize as I've lost many many of my "project" photos. They were on an iPhone that decided to not give them to me... stupid phone. But I managed to get a couple, take a few more and piece this project thread together.

Anyone that is going to reload ammunition
OR work on their led lights (cleaning, repairing, building...) needs a bench. You just do. Sure, you could work on your guns on your dining room table - which may discourage your daughter from bringing her dates home; but the wife tends get upset. And with reloading, as anyone who does reload can attest, you need a STURDY bench due to the movement and the force required when cranking on the lever of the reloading press. A flimsy table will cause issues such as powder spills and general messes that can prove to be rather dangerous.

So a bench I needed as I was getting into reloading.

I searched for online plans and found several "economy" models - but none of them seemed to do the trick. They were all lacking in one way or another. The, as if in a poof of magic, I found the National Reloading Manufacturers Association's plans in a .pdf which I have linked to through the photo - just click on the picture to be taken to the online .pdf

Image

Now, for me - that design is perfect. The problem with the plans, for me, was the overall price. It was calling for solid oak - and this bench, as you will see, can be easily made with press-board for a much lower cost.

As I said before, I lost a lot of my project photos. However, here is a photo of the bench in construction:
Image
It is a shame that I lost so many photos as I had, more or less, a step by step process in photos - but now, I have a general overview and a simple recommendation that this is the bench which you should build given the tools, capability and space.

Image
As you can see between the first and second photos, I had to chop the legs a bit as the seating height wasn't comfortable, and it has been stained. Also, I put several coats of clear polyurethane on the work-space area of the bench. It's crucial for that to be smooth and free of splinters. Wiping a powder spill off of press-board would be difficult at best. So, you will certainly want to build up the layers of polyurethane to the point that the bench feels smooth to the touch.

It took me a bit to get everything set up the way I wanted it and you may or may not choose to set it up the same way - but this is what works for me and how I like it:

Image
The above is the "general overview" pic, and the current configuration of the bench and work area. The Left side is dedicated to gun cleaning, repairs and building, and the right is my reloading area.

Image
The first lower shelf and the ground "shelf" are both plenty deep for two large Cabella's Style dry-box ammo cans per spot, or for whatever storage you wish to put down there.

Image
The right side of the bench, I have set up with the press and for my general reloading area. The press is bolted directly to the bench and doesn't wiggle or shake at all. It's imperative that you use solid wood for the base as you NEED weight on the bench to keep things from rocking and rolling when you use the press. Everything is bolted down. I even mounted my Dillon quick changers to the bench. I use those so I can switch between .40 cal and 9mm in under a minute and continue to reload without wasting time re-setting my dies.

Image
The left side of the bench has been dedicated to gun cleaning, repair and building. And you can see my current AR-15 build in progress. One thing that is not shown is my vice. It is currently mounted elsewhere, but I will be relocating it to this bench for the sake of convenience. Unless you have arms like Popeye, you'll need a vice to build an AR. And they are just damn handy to have for many other things when dealing with guns.

Image
The internal shelves can be positioned for different heights. For me, I've chosen to use one of the right-side spaces for my primers (above) and my reloading manuals (below).

Image
And of course, everyone needs a place for their tools. Now this isn't all my tools - but mostly just my gun specific ones. Roll punches, pin guides, and all the other goodies.

This bench has MANY other storage compartments which I use for powder, spent primers, cleaning kits, lubrication and everything. It is, for me, the ultimate Reloading and gun work-bench that is out there. If you can put it together - do it. This design is highly recommended.


Enjoy and have fun.
Seems like very exciting project.. There is lot to learn from this project..I am working on Reloading & Gun Workbench project so will post my details very soon

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